Corner Royal and Dauphin 

Look across the street, down Dauphin Street. On December 31, 1841, the Cowbellions performed their first tableau at the Alhambra, on Dauphin Street, just west of Royal. 
When it opened in December, 1839, the new Alhambra was described in the New Orleans Times Picayune

ALHABRA FOR EXHIBITIONS, CONCERTS, etc. 
The proprietor of the "ALHAMBRA," having now completed the decoration appointment of his superb Saloon, attached to the establishment, which from its noble dimensions and elegant arrangements, is far better adapted for Exhibitions and Concerts, or similary refined amusement.

The magnificent Saloon is 90 feet in length by 40 in width. It has an elevation of nearly 25 feet. No expense has been spared to render the entire establishment unrivaled in elegance or fashion. It is superbly furnished with the most modern and appealing articles to be procured at the North. 

The location of the "Alhambra" renders it perfectly eligible for any popular purpose.

The First African-American Parading Association, the Order of Doves, organized in 1894.  Their first parade that year began on this corner. 

On March 4, 1897, the Mobile Daily Register reported that the Order of Doves held their "4th Annual" parade in which about 30 of the 50 members marched ... 

"...from their quarters through Dauphin, Royal and St. Louis Streets to the Gilmer Hall, making a very pretty show." 

"Their costumes represented no particular cast, they were made up of silk, sating, velvets and represented princes, knights and cavaliers." 



On March 4, 1897,
the Mobile Daily Register
reported the
Order of Doves,
the first African-American mystic parading society,  
held their "4th Annual" parade in which about 30 of the 50 members marched ... 

"...from their quarters through Dauphin, Royal and St. Louis Streets to the Gilmer Hall, making a very pretty show." 

"Costumes represented no particular cast, they were made up of silk, sating, velvets and represented princes, knights and cavaliers." 


Mobile History Museum Archives

  Knoxville Journal, February 26, 1895

 Times Democrat, February 18, 1896

Charles Torrey, archivist of the Mobile History Museum, has compiled a list of early Order of Doves Members with information about each.

Members included the names:
Willis Banks
Alexander Boyd
Claiborne Carter
J. Evans
Francisco Gomez
Thomas Jackson
Frank Leavens
Henderson Morgan
William Moulton
John Preston
Samuel Washington 

 Freeman (Indianapolis, Indiana), February 10, 1910

The route announced by Joe Cain and the Lost Cause Minstrels was in the first years begun at the Battle House. But, beginning in 1871, their starting point shifted to the south, where they could get ready at the photography shop of friend Henry Hughes.  

In 1873, for example, the Mobile Register reported this rather comically detailed explanation of the parade route. 

For more information, click HERE 

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